Sixgill Videos

Although this website is devoted to the Sevengill [Notorynchus cepedianus], occasionally, we run into a rare treat with videos of their close cousins, the Six Gill [Hexanchus griseus], such as this one generously provided by Craig Miller of Puget Sound, WA.

PS: Vallorie Hodges, of the Oregon Coast Aquarium has confirmed that the appearance of visible claspers behind the anal fin would indicate that this a male.


Craig Miller is an experienced diver in the Pacific Northwest who took this amazing video of a Sixgill Shark (Hexanchus griseus) in Puget Sound, a close ‘cousin,’ if you will, to the Sevengill sharks we’ve been seeing recently here in San Diego (Notorynchus cepedianus), but which normally inhabits much deeper waters.


8-5-10: Seattle Aquarium Video:

http://news.discovery.com/animals/videos/animals-sixgill-sharks-still-a-mystery.htm

 

Slow-Cruising Sixgill Shark

Appearing out of the darkness 200m (650 ft) deep in NOAA Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary, a bluntnose sixgill shark cruised by ROV Hercules last night. Resting along the seafloor during the day, these sharks cruise closer to the surface to feed at night. One of the larger sharks in the Eastern Pacific, they can stretch over 16ft long, bluntnose to tail!

Posted by Nautilus Live on Tuesday, July 11, 2017

Slow-Cruising Sixgill Shark

Appearing out of the darkness 200m (650 ft) deep in NOAA Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary, a bluntnose sixgill shark cruised by ROV Hercules last night. Resting along the seafloor during the day, these sharks cruise closer to the surface to feed at night. One of the larger sharks in the Eastern Pacific, they can stretch over 16ft long, bluntnose to tail!

Posted by Nautilus Live on Tuesday, July 11, 2017